Dr. Mark Holterman is Pushing For Improvements In Vietnam’s Pediatric Health Care

Children’s health is so important. Because their bodies aren’t fully developed, they are most susceptible to illness, and their bodies take much longer to heal. A pediatric physician from the University of Illinois College of Medicine is an advocate for sustainable pediatric healthcare, and an active supporter of the International Pediatric Specialists Alliance for the Children of Vietnam, or IPSAC-VN.

In his five years with the University Hospital, Dr. Mark Holterman has maintained the position as professor of pediatric surgery and is committed to improving the quality of healthcare for children in Vietnam. The company supports medical facilities and medical professionals in Vietnam by providing medical personnel, supplies, and a host of other helpful resources. Thinking of the future, IPSAC-VN also has a scholarship program designed to help practitioners and medical professionals further their training and education in the United States. To qualify for the program, applicants must simply provide a letter of recommendation from their current institution that details the positive contributions they intend to make to the world of pediatric medicine. Learn more about Dr. Mark Holreman at Interview.net.

Scholarship recipients receive $2,500 to help with their journey to the United States. For up to two months, scholars either receive training in medical research or participate in clinical exams. Following the completion of the program, students return to Vietnam where they share their experience with program supporters and explain how they plan to use their experiences to create advancements in pediatric healthcare. Learn more on Crunchbase about Dr. Mark Holterman.

Dr. Holterman is a graduate of the University of Virginia Medical School and is committed to finding treatments and cures for some of the most common chronic health conditions. He is a member of the American Diabetes Association and an advocate for reliable and sustainable health care for children all over the world. In September, Dr. Holterman teamed up with the American Diabetes Association to introduce Camp PowerUp. Designed for patients between ages eight and 16 is designed to empower and educate children about diabetes through physical activity and conscious eating. The ADA and Dr. Holterman hope that the program will lower the potential of patients developing type 2 diabetes.

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